After The Interview, Part 2 – Following Up

You’ve interviewed and sent thank you notes, so you’re done, right? Not quite. There are still a few more steps you can take to strengthen your candidacy.

Follow-Up With Your References

After writing your thank you note, you should also immediately contact anyone who you had provided to the company as a reference. Let them know about your interview and how it went, and prepare them to answer any questions that might have come up during the interview. For example, if the interviewer was particularly interested in a project you worked on with a colleague, let him or her know that so they will be prepared to answer any questions that the interviewer had about that work. And ask the reference to let you know if they are contacted for a reference check.

How — And When — To Follow-Up With The Interviewer

Sometimes, the interviewer won’t know the specific timetable or process for moving forward towards a job offer. Other times, the promised time for the “next step” will come and go, and you’re left wondering if you didn’t make the cut, or if another candidate received the offer. The only way to find out if you’re still in the running is to follow-up. But you don’t want to look like a pest, either.

Here’s how to handle some specific situations:

  • If you were told the next step would happen by a certain date, and that date has passed. What to do: At the end of the interview, you asked the HR person or the hiring manager how he/she would prefer to be contacted. Follow their wishes. If they wanted to be contacted by email, draft a message that re-introduces yourself and reminds them of when you interviewed (and for which position). State that you were anticipating hearing from him/her by (date), and you were contacting him/her to inquire about the status of the hiring process. Have they postponed the next step — and, if so, are you still being considered as a candidate? (Follow the same process if calling to follow-up.)
  • If you promised to follow-up on a certain date. What to do: If you made a promise in the interview to contact the interviewer on a certain date, make sure you do it! This is often used as a test by an interviewer — can the applicant follow instructions? This is especially important if you were asked to send something after the interview (for example, to write a sample report, or submit a writing sample).
  • If you’ve completed several interviews and are waiting on a job offer. What to do: Often the hiring process takes longer than anticipated — and the most common delay happens between the last round of interviews and when a candidate is selected for a job offer. In some cases, the decision may come down to two finalists, and one person is offered the job first. If he or she declines, you may then be offered the job. Don’t be pushy or sound desperate at this stage. Instead, be confident and helpful. A follow-up call or email at this point asks one simple question, “Do you need anything else from me to help you make the hiring decision?” You may preface that with, “I know you’re busy, and I don’t want to take up too much of your time, but I wanted to make sure you had everything from me that you needed.”

Also, stay in contact with your references during this time. Check in with them and see if the interviewer or a reference check company has contacted them. This will often give you a clue that the hiring process is moving forward. (But keep in mind, not all companies — or interviewers — check references.)

Get The Offer

The hiring process isn’t over until it’s really over. Remember, no matter how well the interview went, the job isn’t yours until you receive an offer, accept it, and it’s approved. While it’s rare for an offer to be rescinded after it’s made, it does happen.

So, if you are offered a job verbally, ask for the offer in writing. The offer letter should spell out the requirements of the position and the terms of employment, including salary, benefits, reimbursement of expenses, and any conditions of agreement (for example, hiring conditional on a successful background check or credit check).

If you follow these guidelines, you will not only increase your chances of securing the job offer, but you’ll also increase your confidence as you understand the process. While you won’t get offered every job you interview for, remember that you only need one job offer, if it’s the job you want!

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About Charlotte Weeks - Executive Career Coach / Executive Resume Writer / Outplacement Consultant

Prior to founding Weeks Career Services, Inc. Charlotte Weeks worked in human resources at a national association, where she experienced the hiring process from the other side. She's also the past president of The National Resume Writers' Association (The NRWA). Charlotte specializes in providing C-level executives (CEO, CFO, CMO, etc.), association executives, executive directors and senior-level professionals (director, VP, SVP, etc.) with comprehensive career coaching services and high-ROI resumes. She is author of "I Want a Job in an Association -- Now What?? A Guide to Getting a Job in a Professional Association, Membership Organization, or Society" and featured author of "101 Great Ways to Enhance Your Career." Additional book contributions include "The Twitter Job Search Guide," "Resumes That Pop!," and "Step-by-Step Cover Letters." As an internationally-recognized expert, Charlotte provides programs and documents tailored to each individual’s needs. To ensure that each person is given the highest quality of attention and service, Charlotte works with a limited number of new clients each month. For more information about Charlotte, please visit her Web site at www.WeeksCareerServices.com.
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