After the Interview, Part 1 – The Thank You Note

When you are one of many candidates being considered, what you do after the interview can set you apart significantly and increase your chances of being offered the job.

The first — and most important — thing to do is to send a follow-up note. The etiquette for thank you letters after the interview has changed as email takes a larger role in communication during the hiring process. Surveys reveal a wide disparity of preferences among hiring managers about whether a handwritten or emailed note is best. However, what hasn’t changed is the need to send a thank you note. It’s a must.

If you have decent penmanship, access to preprinted thank you cards, and can handwrite a note immediately after the interview, go for it. Just make sure you mail it right away so that it arrives the next day, or within 2-3 days of the interview. Make sure you address the card correctly so that it will be received directly by the interviewer. Be sure to spell the interviewer’s name correctly! And double-check the card to ensure you didn’t spell anything wrong.

If your handwriting could use some help, or you wouldn’t be able to mail a card promptly, email is also acceptable for sending a thank you message. Just make sure you address the email to the right person. For a subject line, you can use something like, “Great to Meet You Today” or “Thanks for Meeting with Me Yesterday.” (And again, spelling counts here too!). Do not send the thank you from your work email, but make sure the personal account you use sounds professional – your first and last name in the address is ideal.

What should you write in the thank you note? The best post-interview thank you notes are brief and to the point.

Cover these four points:

  1. Address the person by name. (Ms. Jones or Mr. Smith, not “Bob” or “Nancy,” unless the interviewer directed you to use his or her first name.)
  2. Thank them for their time and the opportunity to interview for the (name of position).
  3. Mention one thing from the interview that especially resonated with you, or mention an issue (or answer a question) that you felt you didn’t address properly in the interview – but don’t take an apologetic tone. Instead, say something like, “I wanted to clarify what we talked about with staff leadership. I should have emphasized that I do have experience managing teams on cross-functional projects. I would be happy to share additional details, if you’d like.”
  4. Confirm the “next step” from the interview, including what action you will take — or what you’re expecting from the interviewer.

Sample Thank You Note

Dear Mr. Jones,

Thank you for the opportunity to meet with you today to discuss the ABC Company’s job opening for a Sales Director. The plans the company has for expanding into the European commodities market sound incredible, and I think I could be a great asset to the team in this position.

Two things I wanted to emphasize are my language fluency and cultural competence. Having spent two semesters in Belgium during graduate school (and returning there twice for trips in the meantime), I possess the specific understanding of this market that the position requires.

As we discussed in the interview, I look forward to hearing back from you on Monday, and hope that I am selected to participate in the second round of interviews. I really think I can make a significant impact on your international sales in this role. Thanks again for taking the time to meet with me.

Sincerely,

Jane Doe

 

 

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About Charlotte Weeks - Executive Career Coach / Executive Resume Writer / Outplacement Consultant

Prior to founding Weeks Career Services, Inc. Charlotte Weeks worked in human resources at a national association, where she experienced the hiring process from the other side. She's also the past president of The National Resume Writers' Association (The NRWA). Charlotte specializes in providing C-level executives (CEO, CFO, CMO, etc.), association executives, executive directors and senior-level professionals (director, VP, SVP, etc.) with comprehensive career coaching services and high-ROI resumes. She is author of "I Want a Job in an Association -- Now What?? A Guide to Getting a Job in a Professional Association, Membership Organization, or Society" and featured author of "101 Great Ways to Enhance Your Career." Additional book contributions include "The Twitter Job Search Guide," "Resumes That Pop!," and "Step-by-Step Cover Letters." As an internationally-recognized expert, Charlotte provides programs and documents tailored to each individual’s needs. To ensure that each person is given the highest quality of attention and service, Charlotte works with a limited number of new clients each month. For more information about Charlotte, please visit her Web site at www.WeeksCareerServices.com.
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