LinkedIn For Busy Executives – What To Do When You Don’t Have Time

You know that LinkedIn is no longer optional – it’s the #1 way to be found by recruiters and one of the easiest ways to grow your network and enhance your professional reputation.

However, many busy executives (and which AREN’T busy?) are hesitant to interact on the site. And with good reason. Since there’s so much that can be done on LinkedIn, it’s easy to assume it’ll take up more time than you have. Plus, it doesn’t exactly look great if a member of the C-Suite appears to be spending the majority of their day on social media, even if it is a professional site.

Still, there’s a middle ground. Here are a few ways to make the most of LinkedIn with just a small time investment:

SET IT AND FORGET IT

Sort of. While LinkedIn is always a work in progress, changes are much more minor after you’ve built a solid profile. Once you’ve got keyword-optimized content that positions you the way you want to be perceived, you’ll start getting more profile views from your target audience.

SPEND 5 MINUTES A DAY

Regular activity is important for your visibility, and fairly simple to maintain. By building it into your daily routine (such as going onto LinkedIn each day before you check your email), visiting the site will become second nature. It almost doesn’t matter WHAT you do, as long as you do something. A few suggestions: comment on or like posts, acknowledge birthdays and job changes, or share an update.

REPURPOSE CONTENT

Think about material you already have, and use that as your status update. Have you been mentioned in an industry publication? Quoted in the media? Has your company put out a press release? Avoid reinventing the wheel and get more use out of content you already have.

Even if you’re happily employed, your activity on LinkedIn will pay dividends when and if you decide to begin an active job search. If you are hoping to find a new position soon, enhancing your online visibility is a relatively quick way to begin attracting recruiters and potential employers.

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Enrich Your Career Through Associations

Have you thought about joining an association but questioned investing the time and money? It’s time to re-visit the subject.  Seven out of ten adults are members of at least one association, which proves there must be personal or professional benefits.  Listed below are three main ways joining associations can make a positive impact on your career.

1) Education: Furthering your education can make a dramatic impact on your career. Whether you are new to the job market or well placed within your career, you can still benefit from learning new skills or brushing up on old ones. By joining an association, you’ll likely save money on webinars, certification courses, etc., along with access to an abundance of free information through newsletters, blogs, and members-only meetings. Even if you only have time to utilize one of these resources, you’ll stay on top of industry trends.

2) Credibility: Being a member of an industry association looks great on your resume – period.  It also indicates that you’re dedicated to growing within your field.  An association membership provides an instant boost to your resume– the minute you pay your dues you can claim to be a member of that association. You can then highlight your membership with a logo on your website or LinkedIn page.

3) Networking: Associations provide one of the best ways to meet others in your industry. To maximize the benefits of networking, you should be doing it whether you are currently looking for a job or are happily employed.

With so many associations out there, how do you choose which one is best for you? Ask your colleagues or do a Google search for relevant associations in your area (i.e. finance associations + Boston). Consider joining an association an investment in your professional future.

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Keep Your Job Search Going Through The Holiday Months

With the hiring slowdown that typically happens around the holidays, job seekers assume it’s a waste of time to reach out to companies in November and December. Nothing could be further from the truth! True, things do quiet down around HR, and often new positions come in January with the new year’s budget.

But companies ARE still open. Hiring managers and HR employees don’t get these six weeks off of work. Use this quieter time of the year to your advantage. Chances are, you won’t have as much competition since others are probably suspending their job search. You’ll be more likely to get to talk to someone at your target company since they won’t be as busy. Your resume may be read more thoroughly since there won’t be as many coming through. Standing out like this could help you come January, when hiring is back in full force.

Still, it’s not enough to blast your resume out during the month of December and hope for the best. Your search will be much more effective if you’re strategic in your approach. First of all, consider what you want. What positions are you interested in, and at which companies? Do they have an open job posted or are you trying to get on their radar for the future?

Next, determine who you need to talk to. If possible, go straight to the hiring manager of the department. You can often find this out through a little online research or by calling the company’s main number. Drastically increase your odds of getting in touch by finding a contact to refer you.

Be clear on your message and what you have to offer. Your resume should clearly communicate how you can add value to a company, and you should be able to confidently articulate this when you make contact with the decision maker. Finally, remember that this is process. Be prepared to follow up, wait, follow up again, and be told to call back after the new year. Though it’s easy to get discouraged, rest assured that you’re ahead of the curve and this can only help you end your job hunt with an offer!

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How to Present Yourself Professionally During a Video Interview

In today’s tech filled world, where so much of business can be conducted online, we are seeing more web-based meetings, tutorials – and interviews. With companies cutting expenses whenever possible, it’s likely that someday you’ll be in the position of interacting with a prospective employer through videoconferencing. When using a system such as Skype, you don’t have the luxury of receiving the same cues of an audience. This can lead to distracting habits such as rocking in the chair, wavering side-to-side, or veering into off topic chatter.

Of course, many of the basics of professional in-person meetings still apply – speak clearly, dress nicely, and spend time preparing material beforehand. Below are a few other tips to remember. Put into practice, they’ll help you not only boost your confidence but also improve the impression you make on the virtual audience.

1)      Eliminate distractions: Before the call, make sure your telephone ringer is turned off, your pets are in another room, and/or your office door is shut. Close out any programs, such as your e-mail, that might be pull your focus (or be visible in a screenshare). It is important to focus on the event at hand and what you will be saying. Distractions will not only affect you but the person(s) on the other end as well.

2)      Give your appearance extra care:  Since the top half of your body is what will be seen, choose your shirt carefully. Generally, it is best to avoid wearing busy patterns and all white on camera.

3)      Remember to stay still and speak clearly: It can be easy to fall into casual mode when you’re sitting by yourself either in your office or in your home. Until the interview is over, treat the situation exactly as you would if you were having it in person. Avoid rocking in your chair, reaching for a drink, or mumbling. Do a trial run with your equipment to make sure you know how to operate it – you don’t want to be fidgeting with cords or other items while the meeting is taking place!

4)      Stay Flexible: As wonderful as technology is, it does fail, and usually at the worst times! If this happens during your interview, make the best of it. Offer to follow-up with documents if you cannot access them for the meeting. If your webcam isn’t working for interview and rescheduling isn’t an option, be honest and make the best of the situation. Your audience will appreciate your flexibility and calm demeanor.

Follow me on Twitter @CharlotteWeeks

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Resigning Gracefully

Once you find the job that brings you joy, it’s can be tempting to be done with your current employer immediately (especially if you really didn’t like the job, boss, and/or co-workers). After all, you got a new position, so who cares about where you were – right? Wrong.

We’ve all fantasized about leaving and never coming back, and it seems like now is your chance. While that day is obviously coming, it shouldn’t be the same day you receive an offer.

Standard protocol is to give a minimum of 2 weeks’ notice ­– whether you’re a teenager working at the mall or an executive leading a company. Even if you loathed the place and can’t imagine staying on one more day, in the end it will benefit you to do so. You’ll maintain goodwill with your current employer, and not give them ammunition to hurt your reputation. You won’t burn bridges with co-workers who will have to pick up your responsibilities until a replacement has been hired. Most importantly, it’ll signal to your new company that you’ll be respectful to them when and if you choose to move on.

Though protocol may vary slightly by company, relationship with boss, etc., here are guidelines for resigning gracefully:

1) Tell your supervisor before anyone else, either in person or on the phone.

2) Provide them with a resignation letter at the same time or follow up after with an email.

3) Offer a minimum of 2 weeks’ notice, but be mindful of agreements made when you were hired. Some companies request 3-4 weeks, or even more.

4) Continue working as hard as you would if you weren’t leaving. You’ll leave your former employer with a positive impression, and that can follow you throughout your career.

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Find Out If A Company Is Right For YOU

Most people understandably worry about how they come across to an employer. They want to get an interview, ace the questions, and get an offer. Most candidates don’t spend even a fraction of the time thinking about how THEY feel about the company.

The reasons vary, but when eager to get a new job, most people hand all of their power to the potential employer. The interview process is a two-way street, and it’s worth taking the time to determine if you want to work somewhere – before getting hired. With a high percentage of new hires leaving within their first six months on the job, proper research will help you beat the odds and find a long-term fit. This will save you time, money, and energy in the end – the last thing you probably want to do is re-start an active job search so soon!

So, how can you find out if a company is a good fit?

1)    Check out the company’s website. It sounds like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised how many people overlook this resource!

2)    Google the company, but go back several pages. This is where you’re more likely to find information NOT put out by the company.

3)    Visit CareerBliss.com and GlassDoor.com. Both sites include company reviews given anonymously by employees.

Of course, nothing takes the place of talking to someone directly. Find an internal contact and see what you can learn “off the record.” Also, practice reading – and seeing – between the lines. When you go to the company to interview, do the employees seem happy? Are there numerous empty seats? These types of observations can help you get a read on the state of a company and its culture.

Though there are always unknowns, conducting a wide range of research activities will improve your odds of getting into a company where you’ll be happy to stay.

 

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Keeping Your Job Search A Secret From Your Employer

Many people are understandably concerned that their current company will find out they’re looking for a new position. Though nothing is 100% foolproof, here is the most effective thing you can do: make managing your career a part of your lifestyle.

This is good practice even if you’re happily employed. It keeps you top of mind for great opportunities you might not have considered. But keeping your current company in the dark is a side benefit. If you always keep your LinkedIn profile updated, they won’t suspect you’re looking for a new role. If you wear a suit to work once a week, you won’t be advertising “I have an interview!” when you finally do dress up.

Applying online is the one place where things can get tricky. If the name of a company is kept confidential, you could end up inadvertently sending your resume to your current employer (this HAS happened)! If there’s even a chance this could be the case, it’s best to avoid applying to the position.

People are also concerned that having an online brand – a blog, Twitter account, etc. – would lead their employers to suspect they’re in the market for a new job. While you can’t control what anyone else thinks, it’s unlikely this would raise a red flag if you position it correctly. Again, since you should always be managing your career, this won’t seem like a sudden move. But establishing yourself as a subject-matter expert could benefit your company as well. You’ll build a positive reputation and can make valuable connections that could be an asset to your company (for example, sales prospects or vendors).

All this being said, you still need to use common sense. Don’t divulge any proprietary company information; don’t bash your company, job, or employer; and make sure everything you put online is appropriate.

 

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